Showing posts with label principal property relief. Show all posts
Showing posts with label principal property relief. Show all posts

Friday, November 16, 2018

Changes in off-plan treatment for PPR relief

Principal property relief (PPR) sometimes also called private residence relief (PRR) saw its usefulness seriously curtailed following a recent decision of the Upper Tribunal (UT) that overturned a First-tier Tribunal (FTT) ruling of 2017. The issue at stake is how to determine the date of acquisition of an off-plan property and the new ruling means that property owners should be very cautious when they purchase off-plan their principal residence.

PPR reduces any taxable capital gain on a property if the property has been used as a principal residence for part of its ownership. The case in question concerned the definition of ownership for the purpose of the relief. HMRC argued that the date of acquisition was the date when contracts were exchanged whereas the taxpayer argued it was the date when he was finally able to occupy the property, three years later. The FTT agreed with the taxpayer but HMRC appealed and the UT decided to side with HMRC.

The UT took the view that even though there was a period when the property was not even a dwelling, it was a chargeable asset nonetheless. As a matter of fact, the taxpayer had the right all along to sell the property and therefore there was no doubt that profit from such a sale would be taxable.

Now, not all is lost in case the delay in taking up occupation is less than a year (2 years at most in exceptional circumstances) thanks Extra Statutory Concession D49 that allows for relief in such a case. But caution should be exercised if you suspect there will be delays in construction as it will now most probably have negative tax implications for the homeowner upon resale.

Friday, September 13, 2013

Annual Tax on Enveloped Dwellings due soon

Announced in the March 2012 Budget, the Annual Tax on Enveloped Dwellings (ATED) return -- called at the time the Annual Residential Property Tax (ARPT) -- is due by October 1st 2013. The corresponding tax liability has to be paid by October 31st 2013.

If all of the following criteria are met, an ATED return is required by 1 October 2013:
  • a company (other than a company acting as trustee of a settlement or as nominee), a partnership with corporate partners or a collective investment scheme which holds UK residential property, and
  • at least one single-dwelling interest was worth more than £2m on 1 April 2012 or at the date of acquisition if later, and
  • the single-dwelling interest was still owned on 1 April 2013

Thursday, December 20, 2012

Owning UK property in an offshore company

Until recently UK resident and non-domiciled individuals investing in UK property would have been advised to use an offshore company to hold the title. This not only allowed the owner to avoid the 40% UK inheritance Tax (IHT) but also offered the potential for future buyers to avoid stamp duty (SDLT) by acquiring the company shares rather than property title to the UK property. Perhaps not surprisingly the UK government decided to legislate in this year's Budget to prevent this loss of revenue from residential properties (commercial properties are unaffected).

The draft legislation published on 11th December 2012 outlines the new taxes and charges which will have to be paid by Non Natural Persons (NNP) owning property in the UK. There is already a new punitive rate of Stamp Duty (SDLT) where a NNP acquires a UK residential property for more than f2m (15% instead of 7%). And from April 2013, NNPs owning properties valued in excess of £2m will also be subject to an annual charge (called the Annual Residential Property Tax or ARPT). The charge will be £15,000 for properties valued between £2m and £5m, £35,000 for properties valued between £5m and £20m and £140,000 thereafter.