Showing posts with label pensions. Show all posts
Showing posts with label pensions. Show all posts

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Pension contributions: time is running out...

It's now the time of the year to start thinking about funding savings and pensions. And all the more this year as starting next year, high earners will see their tax benefits on pensions seriously curtailed.

There are no changes this year in VCTs, EIS and SEIS funds so there is no need to talk about those. Please refer to our previous articles on the subject. So what changes to expect this year?

1. As every year, make sure to fully fund your ISA

Each of us is entitled to pay up to £15,240 prior to 5th April 2016 into our ISA. And for the 17/18 tax year the limit will increase to £20,000. Before July 1, 2014, you could only invest half your annual ISA allowance into cash. However, following changes to ISA rules, you can invest the full £15,240 allowance into a cash ISA. This is an interest-bearing account that carries no risk, although as interest rates are so low, your returns may be eroded by inflation. Also note that you can invest some of your allowance in Innovative Finance ISA, such as P2P funds.

Don't forget that your kids have an allowance as well. The Junior ISA allowance for 16/17 is £4,080.

Saturday, September 29, 2012

Automatic pension enrollment starts

With life expectancy increasing, millions of people are not saving enough to have the income they are likely to need in retirement. Pension saving has fallen across all age groups, with less than one in three adults contributing to a pension, although its steepest fall is among those aged 22-29, falling from 43% in 1997 to 24% today.

To force people to start saving now, the Government has come up with a scheme that automatically enrolls those working in both the private and public sectors into a workplace pension. The scheme starts next week and you'll be automatically enrolled into a workplace pension if you:
  • Are not already in a pension at work.
  • Are aged 22 or over.
  • Are under the state pension age, which is currently 65 for men and 61 and two months for women, although this is gradually rising to 65 by 2018.
  • Earn more than £8,105 a year.