Showing posts with label nondom. Show all posts
Showing posts with label nondom. Show all posts

Monday, March 27, 2017

Non doms: BIR rules relaxed

Business Investment Relief (BIR) is a very attractive relief for non domiciled persons who have untaxed earnings or mixed funds abroad and who wanted to invest in the UK.

It is used a lot in conjunction with EIS or SEIS investments allowing people to bring in untaxed earnings without being taxed under the remittance basis and at the same time benefit from the tax relief provided by such schemes. New legislation included in Finance Bill 2017 now makes the BIR scheme even more flexible for any investment made on or after 6 April 2017. Here are the changes:
  1. The definition of a qualifying investment will be extended to the acquisition of existing shares and not just newly issued shares in a target company.
  2. Where the target company is preparing to trade or hold trading investments, the period during which it must actually do so will be extended from 2 to 5 years.

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Non doms: rebasing opportunity in April

We mentioned a fund un-mixing opportunity for non-doms in a previous article. There is another opportunity for non-doms this year, albeit only available to non-doms who become deemed domiciled in April 2017 and that have actually paid the Remittance Basis Charge (RBC) in a previous tax year. In order to become deemed domiciled in the UK in  April, one needs to have been resident for at least 15 of the last 20 tax years. If the RBC has been paid in a previous tax year past, it will be possible to rebase any assets which hold unrealised capital gains as at 5th April 2017. If those assets are then sold and remitted into the UK, only gains that accrue after April 2017 will be taxable in the UK.

Rebasing applies on an asset by asset basis and there will is no requirement that any part of the sales proceeds relating to the part of the gain which arose before April 2017 should be left outside the UK. Where the asset was originally purchased with clean capital, the entire proceeds from the disposal can be brought to the UK without triggering a remittance. However, where it was purchased wholly or partly with foreign income and gains, an element of the disposal proceeds will still relate to those income and gains and so will be subject to the remittance basis in the normal way when the proceeds are brought to the UK.

Friday, February 17, 2017

Non-doms: New Mixed Fund Cleansing Opportunity

Individuals who have been taxed on the remittance basis will have a window of two tax years from April 2017 to rearrange their mixed funds held in overseas bank accounts. Where adequate records have been kept, some amounts can then be remitted to the UK from such accounts free of tax.

The opportunity will be available to all non-UK domiciled individuals who have paid tax on the remittance basis at some point prior to 6 April 2017, even if they have not paid the remittance basis charge. This includes those where the remittance basis applied without being claimed (for example when an individual's foreign income or gains were less than £2,000). It is not available however to individuals born in the UK with a UK domicile of origin who would have become non domiciled at a later date.

This will provide a valuable opportunity for many non-UK domiciled individuals to "top-up" clean capital accounts to finance UK expenditure. The individual will need to analyse the sources of funds in the account such that an amount equal to or at least less than the clean capital can be identified. This could prove to be a time-consuming and potentially expensive process for accounts which have been in existence for some time and / or where there has been plenty of activity, particularly in terms of additions, acquisitions, disposals and withdrawals.

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Feared non-dom reform is a go!

Following the Brexit vote, some people were wondering if the non-dom reform announced in the previous budget would indeed go forward or be shelved for the time being. There were concerns that many high net worth individuals would then decide to leave the UK putting further pressure on the premium property market. It seems that these concerns were not enough to stop the changes and now the government has released a further consultation document in which they confirm that they will press ahead with the proposed changes to the taxation of non-domiciled individuals. Here are the key changes:


IHT on Residential Property

The government has confirmed that, from 6 April 2017, all UK residential property will fall within the scope of UK inheritance tax. This means that shares in overseas companies holding UK residential property will no longer be considered as excluded property for IHT purposes, and will therefore be chargeable to UK IHT on the death of the owner, regardless of their domicile status. This treatment will also extend to overseas partnerships owning UK residential property. The definition of residential property is likely to follow the existing definition of a dwelling under the Non-Resident Capital Gains Tax rules.

Many non-UK domiciled have traditionally held UK residential property through an offshore structure in order to avoid exposure to IHT. Even following the introduction of the ATED (Annual Tax on Enveloped Dwellings) charge that now applies to properties worth over £500,000 held by an overseas company or other structure, many non-doms chose to retain their structures, accepting the ATED charge on the basis that the property would not be subject to UK IHT on their death.

Saturday, October 18, 2014

Why overtaxing non-doms is not a good idea

Wealthy foreigners living in the UK are paying less income tax, but it is unclear whether this is due to relocation or rearrangement of their tax affairs. According to HM Revenue & Customs figures released under a Freedom of Information request, the amount of income tax paid by non-domiciled residents fell from £11.4bn in 2011-12 to £10.8bn in 2012-13, the most recent year for which estimates are available.

This was largely due to a £500m fall in the income tax yield from non-doms who elect to be taxed on a so-called “remittance basis” to £4.6bn. While this represents a 10 per cent year-on year decline in revenues in 2012-13, the number of individuals claiming the remittance basis that year fell by only 6 per cent to 46,700. Under the remittance basis, income and gains from UK sources are taxable along with any foreign income and gains brought to the UK. Income generated overseas that is not repatriated to the UK is not liable for tax. To benefit from this, an annual charge of £30,000 is payable after seven years as a UK resident, rising to £50,000 after 12 years. Non-doms who do not choose to be taxed on the remittance basis are liable to pay UK tax on their global income and gains.

Friday, August 8, 2014

Back to Back loans and Remittance

The Government has announced that it is withdrawing its current treatment for commercial loan arrangements secured using unremitted foreign income or gains as collateral for a loan enjoyed in the UK. Money brought to or used in the UK under a loan facility secured by foreign income or gains will be treated as a taxable remittance of that amount of foreign income or gains. If the loan is serviced or repaid from different foreign income or gains, the repayments of capital and interest will constitute remittances in the normal way. HMRC have updated their guidance at RDRM33170.

HMRC consider that a large numbers of arrangements are not commercial and are not within the intended scope of the guidance. There was no consultation prior to the announcement and was effective immediately following HMRC’s announcement on 4 August 2014. Further details from HMRC can be found here.

Thursday, January 9, 2014

Nominating income when paying the RBC

For non-domiciled residents (RND) who have been in the UK for more than 7 out of the 9 previous tax years, using the remittance basis (i.e. choosing to be taxed on UK income only as long as it's not remitted into the UK) has a cost beyond the loss of personal allowances. It's called the remittance basis charge (RBC) and it's currently £30,000 if you have been in the UK for 7 out of the previous 9 tax years or £50,000 if you have been in the UK for 12 out of the previous 14 tax years.

What is less known is that the RBC is actually a tax and therefore if you decide to pay that charge, you also need to nominate the corresponding income. You would think that doing so allows you to bring that taxed income back to the UK without further cost. Unfortunately, HMRC designed the rules so that it becomes impossible to take a credit for the remittance basis charge until and unless all other non-UK income and gains are remitted to the UK. As this is rather unlikely, the RBC is essentially an additional cost of electing to be taxed on the remittance basis.

Friday, September 13, 2013

Annual Tax on Enveloped Dwellings due soon

Announced in the March 2012 Budget, the Annual Tax on Enveloped Dwellings (ATED) return -- called at the time the Annual Residential Property Tax (ARPT) -- is due by October 1st 2013. The corresponding tax liability has to be paid by October 31st 2013.

If all of the following criteria are met, an ATED return is required by 1 October 2013:
  • a company (other than a company acting as trustee of a settlement or as nominee), a partnership with corporate partners or a collective investment scheme which holds UK residential property, and
  • at least one single-dwelling interest was worth more than £2m on 1 April 2012 or at the date of acquisition if later, and
  • the single-dwelling interest was still owned on 1 April 2013

Friday, August 2, 2013

The Remittance: some examples


HMRC will be soon be undertaking an "educational exercise" in respect of individuals taxed under the remittance basis in 2011/12. They are of the opinion that taxpayers may not fully understand the remittance basis, and are concerned that they will have experienced problems in completing their tax returns accurately. They will also be sending out a factsheet with this letter. They say that the intention behind the letters is primarily educational, and hope that it will prompt taxpayers to conclude that they need extra help in this area.

People don't always understand that it's not just a transfer of money that can trigger a remittance. Here are the examples mentioned in the fact list:

Money transfers to the UK

  • You transfer some of your foreign income from your offshore bank account to your UK bank account.
  • You withdraw some cash from your foreign bank account (that contains your foreign income) whilst overseas and bring the cash with you when you return to the UK.
  • You give some of your foreign income to your spouse or civil partner who brings the money to the UK.
  • You transfer some of your foreign income to the UK account of a registered Charity.
  • You rent out your holiday home abroad and the customer pays the rent directly into your UK bank account.
  • You loan some of your foreign income to a company you control overseas or settle some foreign income in an offshore trust. The company or trustees bring the money to the UK.
  • You inherited money a few years ago that you deposited into a foreign interest bearing bank account and you transfer some of the money from this account to the UK. Although the inheritance is not taxable when remitted, the account will also contain taxable interest that will be treated as remitted before any of the non taxable inheritance.

Thursday, December 20, 2012

Owning UK property in an offshore company

Until recently UK resident and non-domiciled individuals investing in UK property would have been advised to use an offshore company to hold the title. This not only allowed the owner to avoid the 40% UK inheritance Tax (IHT) but also offered the potential for future buyers to avoid stamp duty (SDLT) by acquiring the company shares rather than property title to the UK property. Perhaps not surprisingly the UK government decided to legislate in this year's Budget to prevent this loss of revenue from residential properties (commercial properties are unaffected).

The draft legislation published on 11th December 2012 outlines the new taxes and charges which will have to be paid by Non Natural Persons (NNP) owning property in the UK. There is already a new punitive rate of Stamp Duty (SDLT) where a NNP acquires a UK residential property for more than f2m (15% instead of 7%). And from April 2013, NNPs owning properties valued in excess of £2m will also be subject to an annual charge (called the Annual Residential Property Tax or ARPT). The charge will be £15,000 for properties valued between £2m and £5m, £35,000 for properties valued between £5m and £20m and £140,000 thereafter.

Thursday, November 29, 2012

Buying your way into the UK

Property prices in London have challenged economic conditions in the past decade. There is a very simple reason for that. There are just too many rich foreigners coming to the UK. It's actually quite easy to explain. Not only the is the tax system very attractive for them thanks to the non-domicile status but it's quite easy to obtain a Visa if you are ready to bring in enough money into the British Economy. In many jurisdictions, obtaining residence visas can be fraught with red tape, delays, quota restrictions and other hidden difficulties, often resulting in refusals of such applications. Not so in the UK.

Here are the options:

The Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visa

The basic requirements for the initial visa are that the individual needs to show evidence of having £200,000 available to invest in the UK and needs to be able to speak English.

Monday, November 19, 2012

The new Statutory Residency Test (SRT)

Currently it can be very difficult to know for sure if one is UK resident or not. The uncertainty has been the reason there has been so many tax cases on that subject, often with a surprising outcome. We have heard about the new Statutory Residency Test (SRT) for a few years now and it looks like it's going to happen next year at last. As a reminder, here is a summary of the current situation today:

If you are not UK resident, you will become UK resident if either applies:
  • You are physically present for 183 days or more in a tax year
  • You have visited the UK for an average of 91 days per annum over 4 consecutive tax years (youwill then be regarded as resident from the beginning of the 5th year)

Thursday, April 19, 2012

EIS and SEIS: a comparison

A number of changes were introduced in the new budget. In particular with respect to private equity investment tax reliefs. Now is the time to invest in startups, with two options both very generous when it comes to providing tax relief both for income tax but also for capital gains tax (and especially for high rate tax payers who are the natural target for those schemes).

Enterprise Investment Scheme (EIS)

Here is a summary of the changes some subject to EU State aid approval being granted:
  • The maximum annual amount that an individual can invest under the EIS will be doubled to £1m for 2012/13 onwards. There will no longer be any minimum investment; it was previously £500 in any one company.

Thursday, March 29, 2012

More bad news for non-doms

Non-domiciled individuals have been watching this Budget particularly carefully as it had already been announced prior to its delivery on 21 March 2012 that the Chancellor would be taking action in relation to individuals who acquire UK property through offshore companies. In order to tackle what the Government calls the 'enveloping' of high value properties into companies to 'avoid paying a fair share of tax', three measures are to be introduced:
  • a new 15% rate of stamp duty land tax (SDLT) to purchases of UK residential properties worth over £2 million by 'non-natural persons'
  • an annual charge on UK residential properties valued at over £2million owned by such persons
  • an extension of the capital gains tax (CGT) regime to gains on the disposal of UK residential property and shares or interests in such property by non-natural persons who are non-resident